10 Ways to Bring Positive Energy Into Your Life

Happy people working

Keep on Moving!

1 According to the laws of physics, all objects in nature are in constant motion. This also applies to the human body. Genes, the environment, and lifestyle lead to changes in cells. Your muscles grow old and lose their mass and strength, and the joints become less flexible. These cellular changes also limit the activity of the heart muscle. As a result, any work becomes more tiring.
So, how can one have more energy after 60? To counteract age changes, doctors recommend 150 minutes per week (that is two and a half hours) of aerobic activity:

Regularly perform stretching exercises to maintain muscle mass. Yoga classes will be suitable. However, always remember – this is not a competition. Do not harm yourself by trying to beat the record.
If you haven’t done any sports for a long time, first visit your doctor or a physiotherapist to recommend something that suits you. Determine the load of the classes you should take.

Wondering How You Can Get Positive Energy?

1. Be aware of your negative thoughts and emotions

Barbara Fredrickson, a positive psychology researcher at the University of North Carolina, in her landmark paper, provides surprising insights into what negative thoughts and emotions do to your brain.
Negative emotions and thoughts narrow your brain and focus your thoughts.

But the truth is, your mind is programmed to respond to negative emotions in the same way. So every time you feel fearful, you automatically shut yourself off from the outside world and limit your options.

2. Avoid speaking of your problems, diseases, illnesses, or worries

3. Meditate

In this research, Fredrickson and her colleagues revealed that people who meditate daily experience display more positive emotions than those who do not. On top of that, people who meditated also built valuable long-term skills. For example, three months after the experiment was over, the people who meditated daily continued to display increased mindfulness, purpose in life, social support, and decreased illness symptoms.

how to meditate relax

They are impermanent. They occur and they dissipate out of your control. So as you practice meditation, what you are practicing is dissociating yourself with your thoughts and emotions, with any construct that you perceive as self. It’s called a transpersonal consciousness that allows you to dwell on the positive energy of love, compassion, joy, peace, and unity.

Meditation practice helps you cultivate presence at the moment. When you withdraw yourself from the outside world, you tap into the essence of the present moment. And being fully in the present moment, you tap into higher consciousness devoid of fear and anxiety.

4. Avoid gossip

At the core of it, gossip is about criticizing and judging others. Remember that everything is energy, so when you place your focus on judging others, you project negative energy, that will get back to you.

5. Avoid falling asleep with the TV on

When you are asleep, your mind goes into delta brainwave frequency. Delta waves are the slowest of all. It’s the direct access to your subconscious. And it’s the ideal choice for deep and powerful reprogramming.

6. Start journaling the moments of gratitude every day

This study, published in the Journal of Research in Personality, examined a group of 90 undergraduate students who were split into two groups. The first group wrote about an intensely positive experience each day for three consecutive days. The second group wrote about a control topic.

Three months later, the students who wrote about positive experiences had better mood levels, fewer visits to the health center, and experienced fewer illnesses.
Gratitude is one of the highest vibrational emotions that you can experience.

Journal moments of gratitude

And when you journal your moment of gratitude every day, you instantly raise your vibration by simply thinking about those positive experiences. Remember, that your subconscious mind doesn’t make a difference between actual reality and imaginary. What you imagine is as real as what you perceive with your 5 senses. So thinking about positive moments has the same effect as actual experience.

7. Visualize the best scenarios

8. Let go of the past

Learn from your mistakes, learn from others’ mistakes, remember that no unkind or thoughtless action ever comes from love but from a place of deep inner pain (you can be compassionate to that pain without condoning the acting out of it) and release the energetic burden you carry: grudges, resentments, pain, hurt, disappointments, sadness, anger, guilt.

9. Laugh! Smile!

Laugh and smile

10. Sweat it off

And in the middle of a long bike ride, walk or swim… or in the middle of the climbing wall, you may suddenly have an epiphany. Or, at least for a while, you will be fully present and not worried about the future.

Recommended Free Masterclass For You

Discover 4 Powerful, Practical Ways to Bring Energy Medicine Into Your Everyday Life

You know that everything is energy. But how do you apply this to your life? Join this free Masterclass for an eye-opening demonstration where you’ll witness firsthand how energy actually runs our reality and walk away with at least four different energy medicine techniques.Reserve My Free Spot Now

40 Genius Ways to Have More Energy After 40

women doing yoga, long marriage tips

Shutterstock

Most people living in the modern world are after more energy. We work too hard, make more commitments than we can handle, and—at least for most people—getting enough sleep is a laughably unrealistic dream. Add aging to the mix, and we’re done for.

But even post-40, there are plenty of strategies you can use up your drive for both work and play. From mental tricks to key nutrients to add to your diet to scheduling smarter, here’s how to boost your energy so you can make your 40s your best decade yet. And if you find yourself in need of an energy boost right this second, try one of these 50 Ways To Be a Higher-Energy Person Immediately.

Man Relaxing More Energy After 40

The urge to do everything and take advantage of all opportunities may be strong, but the reality is that when you’re in your 40s, you can’t constantly bounce from one thing to the next without taking a break. Schedule in rest time in between social and family obligations, and you’ll find yourself feeling more excited about everything on your plate rather than overwhelmed and run down.

Man Texting Significant Other Energy After 40

Shutterstock

File this under: Weird energy tricks that actually work. According to a study in Psychophysiology, thinking about a romantic partner can boost blood glucose and “eustress” (aka the good kind of stress) levels, which provides a boost of energy over time. Whether you’ve been with your partner for ages or are seeing someone new, it looks like thinking about them often could work wonders for your perkiness. And if you don’t have a partner yet, be sure you know The Secret to Making a Great First Impression.

To feel your best, you need fuel in the tank, which means not leaving long gaps between meals and snacks. Instead of of having just three square meals a day, make sure you’re not going longer than four hours without food.

Yes, really. As we age, it becomes more and more tempting to spend time in bed without actually sleeping. This can make it harder for you to get good quality sleep, according to Harvard Health Publishing. Here’s the solution they suggest: Don’t nap during the day, and start out with just four hours of sleep per night.

For as long as you feel you’re getting good quality sleep during the time you’re in bed, keep adding 15 to 30 minutes of sleep per night. This method encourages more restful sleep in the long-term, even though it might seem counterintuitive at first. These 70 Tips For Your Best Sleep Ever should lead you in the right direction.

Avocado Toast Energy After 40

Potassium is a nutrient you don’t hear about as often as others, but it’s important to your energy levels and overall health, especially as you get older. One of the biggest benefits of the nutrient is improved heart health and lower blood pressure, and being deficient in it can seriously zap your desire to do anything or go anywhere. Adults need around 4,700 milligrams of the stuff per day, which is actually quite a lot. Incorporate foods like avocado, spinach, dried apricots, and sweet potato to ensure you’re getting enough of the stuff. These are all some of the 30 Best Foods for Maximizing Your Energy Levels.

Woman Getting a Physical Energy After 40

Shutterstock

The truth is, when you hit your 40s, there are some physiological reasons you might be feeling low energy, from thyroid imbalances to perimenopause to lower testosterone levels. If you’re feeling low on fuel all the time, it’s worth checking in with your doctor about what’s going on; it could be a quick and easy fix. Also, it will help you to know the 10 Secrets for Maximizing Any Doctor’s Visit.

You might think essential oils are BS, but some of them are actually research-backed. “Peppermint is that essential oil that you need on the nightstand,” says Isaac Jones, DC, a functional nutrition expert and chiropractor. “Whether you were out too late with friends or you were up rocking a teething baby, peppermint will do the trick when you need to wake up and get going. It will also boost your performance throughout the day. A study in the Journal of Phytomedicine showed significant improvement in athletic performance when subjects were given peppermint oil.”

Resource:

https://myallamericancare.com/blog/2020/02/24/energy-boost-for-elderly-people-7-ways-to-maintain-energy/
https://blog.mindvalley.com/positive-energy/
https://bestlifeonline.com/ways-to-have-more-energy-after-forty/

Studying 101: Study Smarter Not Harder

a photo of a young asian man studying his notes while lying in bed

Studying 101: Study Smarter Not Harder

Do you ever feel like your study habits simply aren’t cutting it? Do you wonder what you could be doing to perform better in class and on exams? Many students realize that their high school study habits aren’t very effective in college. This is understandable, as college is quite different from high school. The professors are less personally involved, classes are bigger, exams are worth more, reading is more intense, and classes are much more rigorous. That doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with you; it just means you need to learn some more effective study skills. Fortunately, there are many active, effective study strategies that are shown to be effective in college classes.

This handout offers several tips on effective studying. Implementing these tips into your regular study routine will help you to efficiently and effectively learn course material. Experiment with them and find some that work for you.

Reading is not studying

Simply reading and re-reading texts or notes is not actively engaging in the material. It is simply re-reading your notes. Only ‘doing’ the readings for class is not studying. It is simply doing the reading for class. Re-reading leads to quick forgetting.

Think of reading as an important part of pre-studying, but learning information requires actively engaging in the material (Edwards, 2014). Active engagement is the process of constructing meaning from text that involves making connections to lectures, forming examples, and regulating your own learning (Davis, 2007). Active studying does not mean highlighting or underlining text, re-reading, or rote memorization. Though these activities may help to keep you engaged in the task, they are not considered active studying techniques and are weakly related to improved learning (Mackenzie, 1994).

  • Create a study guide by topic. Formulate questions and problems and write complete answers. Create your own quiz.
  • Become a teacher. Say the information aloud in your own words as if you are the instructor and teaching the concepts to a class.
  • Derive examples that relate to your own experiences.
  • Create concept maps or diagrams that explain the material.
  • Develop symbols that represent concepts.
  • For non-technical classes (e.g., English, History, Psychology), figure out the big ideas so you can explain, contrast, and re-evaluate them.
  • For technical classes, work the problems and explain the steps and why they work.
  • Study in terms of question, evidence, and conclusion: What is the question posed by the instructor/author? What is the evidence that they present? What is the conclusion?

Organization and planning will help you to actively study for your courses. When studying for a test, organize your materials first and then begin your active reviewing by topic (Newport, 2007). Often professors provide subtopics on the syllabi. Use them as a guide to help organize your materials. For example, gather all of the materials for one topic (e.g., PowerPoint notes, text book notes, articles, homework, etc.) and put them together in a pile. Label each pile with the topic and study by topics.

Educators and Parents, Sign Up for The Cheat Sheet

These conditions can distract from your lessons. Plus, students are likely to have to do more without a teacher or parent looking over their shoulders. They will have to manage their time and study more on their own. Yet many students never learned those skills. To them, Sana says, it may be like telling students to learn to swim by “just swimming.”

For more than 100 years, psychologists have done research on which study habits work best. Some tips help for almost every subject. For example, don’t just cram! And test yourself, instead of just rereading the material. Other tactics work best for certain types of classes. This includes things like using graphs or mixing up what you study. Here are 10 tips to tweak your study habits.

1. Space out your studying

Nate Kornell “definitely did cram” before big tests when he was a student. He’s a psychologist at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass. He still thinks it’s a good idea to study the day before a big test. But research shows it’s a bad idea to cram all your studying into that day. Instead, space out those study sessions.

a kid sitting at a table studying and looking really stressed out

Cramming before a big test can leave you exhausted. But you’ll learn and remember material better if you space your study sessions over the course of several days. South_agency/E+/Getty Images Plus

In one 2009 experiment, college students studied vocabulary words with flash cards. Some students studied all the words in spaced-apart sessions throughout four days. Others studied smaller batches of the words in crammed, or massed, sessions, each over a single day. Both groups spent the same amount of time overall. But testing showed that the first group learned the words better.

Kornell compares our memory to water in a bucket that has a small leak. Try to refill the bucket while it’s still full, and you can’t add much more water. Allow time between study sessions, and some of the material may drip out of your memory. But then you’ll be able to relearn it and learn more in your next study session. And you’ll remember it better, next time, he notes.

2. Practice, practice, practice!

“If you want to be able to remember information, the best thing you can do is practice,” says Katherine Rawson. She’s a psychologist at Kent State University in Ohio. In one 2013 study, students took practice tests over several weeks. On the final test, they scored more than a full letter grade better, on average, than did students who studied the way they normally had.

In a study done a few years earlier, college students read material and then took recall tests. Some took just one test. Others took several tests with short breaks of several minutes in between. The second group recalled the material better a week later.

3. Don’t just reread books and notes

As a teen, Cynthia Nebel studied by reading her textbooks, worksheets and notebooks. “Over and over and over again,” recalls this psychologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. Now, she adds, “we know that’s one of the most common bad study skills that students have.”

In one 2009 study, some college students read a text twice. Others read a text just once. Both groups took a test right after the reading. Test results differed little between these groups, Aimee Callender and Mark McDaniel found. She is now at Wheaton College in Illinois. He works at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo.

Too often, when students reread material, it’s superficial, says McDaniel, who also co-wrote the 2014 book, Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning. Rereading is like looking at the answer to a puzzle, rather than doing it yourself, he says. It looks like it makes sense. But until you try it yourself, you don’t really know if you understand it.

One of McDaniel’s coauthors of Make it Stick is Henry Roediger. He, too, works at Washington University. In one 2010 study, Roediger and two other colleagues compared test results of students who reread material to two other groups. One group wrote questions about the material. The other group answered questions from someone else. Those who answered the questions did best. Those who just reread the material did worst.

4. Test yourself

That 2010 study backs up one of Nebel’s preferred study habits. Before big tests, her mom quizzed her on the material. “Now I know that was retrieval practice,” she says. “It’s one of the best ways you can study.” As Nebel got older, she quizzed herself. For example, she might cover up the definitions in her notebook. Then she tried to recall what each term meant.

a girl explaining something to her mom

Study Methods

Scientists have been investigating information retention and the studying process for decades. The best way to find the most effective study method for you is to test various tips, such as the ones listed below.

7. Thwart the “Curve of Forgetting”

Scientists started exploring the “curve of forgetting” in 1885, but the concept remains useful to today’s study habits. The gist of the “curve of forgetting” is this: The first time you hear a lecture or study something new, you retain up to 80% of what you’ve just learned — if you review the material within 24 hours. Fortunately, this effect is cumulative; so after a week, you may retain 100% of the same information after only five minutes of review. Generally, psychologists agree this type of interval studying — as opposed to “cramming” — is best, and that students should study closer to the day they learned the material than the day of the test.

8. Use Active Recall

This controversial method of studying was a hot topic in 2009, when a psychology professor published an article advising students against reading and rereading textbooks — which, he argued, merely lead students to thinking they know the material better than they do since it is right in front of them. Conversely, he suggested students use active recall: closing the book and reciting everything they can remember up to that point to practice long-term memorization.

9. Use the Leitner System

Named for its originator, German scientist Sebastian Leitner, the study method forces students to learn, through repetition, the material they know least well. The system involves moving cards with correctly answered questions further down a line of boxes and moving incorrectly answered cards back to the first box. Thus, the cards in the first box are studied most frequently and the interval becomes greater as the student proceeds down the line, forcing her to review again and again the information she doesn’t know.

10. Take the Practice Tests

As you would with the ACT, SAT, or GMAT, take advantage of professors and instructors who make old exams available as practice tests. You can get a sense of the instructor’s testing style and a become familiar with how the information might be presented on the real test day. A 2011 study finds students who tested themselves with a practice test after learning the material retained 50% more of the information a week later than their peers who did not take a practice test.

11. Make Connections

Experts argue that the difference between “slow learners” and “quick studiers” is the way they study; for example, instead of memorizing, “quick learners” make connections between ideas. Known as contextual learning, this process requires students to customize their own methods of learning, thus making connections that inspire all of the information to fall into place and make sense for them individually. Some students find that recording all information visually in one place (such as on a sheet of paper or chalkboard) can help to paint a fuller picture and aid their connections within the learning process.

12. Try the Feynman Notebook Method

Physicist Robert Feynman created this organization-based learning method by writing on the title page of an empty notebook, notebook of things I don’t know about. From there, he developed a technique of deconstruction and reconstruction of ideas, in an effort to understand even the most complicated of concepts. To use this method and learn how to study effectively, first identify what you want to learn. Then, try explaining it as you would to a five-year-old. The Feynman method is ideal for using analogies to further illustrate your concept (e.g., a bonsai tree is just like a big tree, but smaller).

13. Take on the Role of Teacher

What Not to Do When Studying

15. Don’t Overlearn

Once you’ve been able to cycle through your flashcards without making a single mistake, you may feel a sense of satisfaction and call it a day, or you may feel a charge of adrenaline and be tempted to continue studying. When you come to this fork in the road, keep in mind that a sharp onset of diminishing returns during “overlearning.” With a limited amount of time to study each topic, you’re better served moving on to something else.

16. Stop Multitasking

Multitasking is a myth. You may think you’re killing two birds with one stone by texting while studying, for example, but you’re actually forming poor study habits. According to researchers, so-called “multitasking” extends your study time and ultimately may damage your grades.

17. Forget About “Learning Styles”

Researchers and learning experts debate the concept of learning styles, some even go so far as to say they don’t exist. Our conclusion is this: Despite the amount of work on the subject, scientists have found “virtually no evidence” to support the concept of learning styles, though they left the possibility open to further investigation in years to come. We recommend you don’t go out of your way to try to make your material fit a specific style because it may not be worth the time or effort.

Bonus Tip: Don’t Focus on One Subject for Too Long

If you’ve never felt “burned out” from repeatedly studying pages of history notes, scrutinizing chemistry formulas, or practicing music scales, consider yourself lucky. But know that the threat is real. It’s best to vary your material rather than zeroing in persistently on one area. (It is acceptable to join related or similar subject areas together; for example, instead of only memorizing vocabulary, mix in reading as well. If doing math, tackle several concepts together instead of just one.)

Source:

https://learningcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/studying-101-study-smarter-not-harder/
https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/article/top-10-tips-study-smarter-not-longer-study-skills
https://www.thebestcolleges.org/17-scientifically-proven-ways-to-study-better-this-year/

Best 2020 Reads for College Students

A Mind for Numbers

Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don’t Know

Are sitcoms teaching us the wrong lessons about how to talk to strangers? How did Bernie Madoff fool so many people? And what happens when things go wrong on college campuses? In “Talking to Strangers,” Malcolm Gladwell asks why our first impressions can lead us down dangerous paths. By examining how we talk to strangers, Gladwell looks at the misunderstandings and conflicts that shape our lives.

Portrait of Genevieve Carlton

Genevieve Carlton

Genevieve Carlton holds a Ph.D. in history from Northwestern University. After earning her doctorate in early modern European history, Carlton worked as an assistant professor of history at the University of Louisville, where she developed new courses on the history of science, Renaissance Italy, and the witch trials. Carlton has published five peer-reviewed articles in top presses and a monograph with the University of Chicago Press. She also earned tenure with a unanimous vote before relocating to Seattle. Learn more about Carlton’s work at genevievecarlton.com.

Essential Books for Students

I’m big into reading, and since you’re on this page, I’m guessing you like reading at least a little bit as well. This page is an ongoing log of books I find to be awesome or useful.

Yep, I put my own book on the list. There might be a bit of hubris involved here, but I’m extremely proud of how this book turned out. Initially, I set out to write a book on how to study efficiently, defeat procrastination, and stay organized – as I wrote, the project became much grander. The final product is a 100+ page book covering 10 different topics that factor into your grades. In addition to the topics I already mentioned, you’ll learn how to read textbooks effectively, take better notes, write great papers, eliminate distractions, and more Also, it’s completely free.

10 Steps to Earning Awesome Grades (While Studying Less)

If you’re going to college – especially in the U.S. – you need to read this book. I may have graduated with no debt, but the average college graduate these days is coming out of school with around $30,000 of it. Having that amount of debt will limit your options when it comes to jobs, where you can live, etc. This is not how it should be. This is not how it has to be. Debt-Free U will show you how you can go to college and avoid debt – even if your family isn’t loaded.

Debt-Free U

I love this book like a son. Ok, maybe that’s a bit hyperbolic – I’m not cooking dinner for it if it suddenly becomes sentient and tells me it’s hungry. But still – this book is absolutely amazing and I’d consider it essential reading for anyone who falls under the category of “human”. As it turns out, habits shape much more of our behavior than we realize. The habits we do have largely determine the progress (either good or bad) we make in life. Luckily, the way habits are formed can be understood – which means they can be changed – and The Power of Habit is the best overview of how habits work that I’ve ever read.

The Power of Habit

Nick Winter is a crazy dude who did a 120-hour workweek, built two successful startups, learned to throw knives, and pledged $7,290 in order to force himself to write this book (and jump out of an airplane). He doesn’t really subscribe to the whole, “willpower is a limited resource” ideal – instead, he looks for ways to summon massive amounts of motivation so he can achieve anything. This book is an account of his quest to achieve several crazy goals in a very short amount of time, and it also details his methods for hacking motivation.

The Motivation Hacker

It’s over 15 years old now, but Cal Newport’s How to Win at College is still one of the best primers for college success I’ve ever read – especially when it comes to things beyond your grades. It’s a short read (I read it in about four hours), split into 75 “tips” that each take up 1-4 pages. I read this book as a freshman, and it’s one of the biggest reasons I was so focused on success in college; the book provides a great foundation for becoming a remarkable student and doesn’t weigh you down with idle words.

How to Win at College

Whereas How to Win at College is a general, tip-based overview on ways you can become successful in college, this book gets its hands dirty by giving you an in-depth, well thought out method for pulling epic grades in all of your classes. The book is based around that fact that there are many college students who get straight A’s, yet don’t study for more than a couple hours a day and still have plenty of other things going on in their lives. It lays out effective strategies for note-taking, quizzing yourself, writing papers, and more. If you want to be like one of the aforementioned students, get this book.

How to Become a Straight-A Student

I listened to this book during a six-hour drive to a friend’s hometown a few years ago, and I honestly think it changed my life. The habits Covey describes here seem obvious at first, but you’ll probably notice that you aren’t following all of them. I know I wasn’t. Take Habit 5 – Seek First to Understand, Then to be Understood – how many of us actually do that? Before reading this book, I would always think very selfishly in my conversations. Whenever I’d listen to someone else speak, I’d listen – but I’d also be actively formulating my (usually self-serving) response and looking for the perfect moment to throw it in.

“The Book of Longings” by Sue Monk Kidd

In her mesmerizing fourth work of fiction, Sue Monk Kidd takes an audacious approach to history and brings her acclaimed narrative gifts to imagine the story of a young woman named Ana. Raised in a wealthy family with ties to the ruler of Galilee, she is rebellious and ambitious, with a brilliant mind and a daring spirit. Ana is expected to marry an older widower, a prospect that horrifies her. An encounter with eighteen-year-old Jesus changes everything.

Their marriage evolves with love and conflict, humor and pathos in Nazareth, where Ana makes a home with Jesus, his brothers, and their mother, Mary. Ana’s pent-up longings intensify amid the turbulent resistance to Rome’s occupation of Israel, partially led by her brother, Judas. When Ana commits a brazen act that puts her in peril, she flees to Alexandria, where startling revelations and greater dangers unfold, and she finds refuge in unexpected surroundings. Ana determines her fate during a stunning convergence of events considered among the most impactful in human history.

“This I Believe: Life Lessons” edited by Dan Gediman, John Gregors, and Mary Jo Gediman

Based on the NPR series of the same name, “This I Believe” features eighty Americans ― from the famous to the unknown ― completing the thought that the book’s title begins. Each piece compels readers to rethink not only how they have arrived at their own personal beliefs but also the extent to which they share them with others.

The result is a stirring and provocative trip inside the minds and hearts of a diverse group of people whose beliefs ― and the incredibly varied ways in which they choose to express them ― reveal the American spirit at its best.

Julia is the education and personal development editor on the Insider Reviews team. Since October 2020, she’s written about a popular Harvard persuasive writing course, a free UPenn course that explains the science behind COVID-19 vaccines, and a bestselling self-help book seen all over Twitter. She’s also organized and edited a series on how to get unstuck during the pandemic as well as what to do when you get rejected from grad, medical, or law school. Through her work as a sex and relationships editor at Cosmopolitan and BuzzFeed, as well as a freelance lifestyle reporter, Julia learned that she loves interviewing experts and putting together stories that inspire people to make small yet effective changes in their lives. Julia is passionate about accessible, affordable education and is living proof that e-learning has the potential to make career transitions more attainable: During quarantine, she completed a five-month Coursera MasterTrack certificate program in Instructional Design from the University of Illinois while starting her role at Insider. You can say hi to Julia at [email protected] or shoot her a DM on Twitter or Instagram (she is @jaypugz on both). Learn more about how our team of experts tests and reviews products at Insider here. Learn more about how we review educational and personal development products.

Disclosure: Written and researched by the Insider Reviews team. We highlight products and services you might find interesting. If you buy them, we may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our partners. We may receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising team. We welcome your feedback. Email us at [email protected]

Source:

https://thebestschools.org/magazine/gift-ideas-books/
https://collegeinfogeek.com/essential-books-for-students/
https://www.businessinsider.com/guides/learning/college-summer-reading-list-books-2021

Baby Boomers

Baby Boomers

The Baby Boomer Generation

From now until 2030, 10,000 Baby Boomers each day will hit retirement age. Millions will begin to officially retire, collect social security checks and go on Medicare. Other Boomers will keep on working either out of financial necessity or out of some less tangible need like identity and self-worth.

In the several decades prior to the Boom, babies in the U.S. were born at a rate of about 2.5 million a year. Then in 1946, this rate exploded to 3.4 million and maintained this pace for the next few decades. The peak years were 1957 and 1961 with 4.3 million births a year. In all, these years produced about 76 million Baby Boomers. The official retirement age to receive a Social Security check is 62. At 65, you’ll automatically receive Medicare which covers basic health care at 80%. If you wait to retire until you’re 67, your benefit will be about 30% higher than at 62. Wait another three years to retire and you could receive a 75% bigger check. It certainly pays to wait.

Are you a Baby Boomer or do you have a loved one that is? This generation was one of the largest in American history, and it is perhaps one of the most important right now when it comes to senior living. This group of people has very unique personalities, and their life histories are vastly different than today’s younger generation. Here’s a closer look at who they are and what they stand for.

The Baby Boom

The “baby boom” period defined and gave people born in this generation the name “baby boomers.” The baby boom phenomenon in the United States was a sharp rise in birth rates soon after World War II, beginning in 1946 where a record was broken for the highest ever number of births in a calendar year in U.S. history. Around 3.4 million births were recorded during the year.

The trend was only beginning, as higher births continued to be recorded until 1964. Between three million to four million births were recorded annually during the period. The U.S. baby-boom population was about 72.5 million in 1964 and peaked at 78.5 million in 1999 by including immigrants to the U.S. born in the same period. It was the largest generational cohort before being overtaken by millennials.

Baby Boom - US Fertility Rate 1940-1975

  • Soldiers returning from the war came back home with a zeal to start families and raise children after holding off on marriage until after the war.
  • The improved economic position of the United States soon after the war encouraged raising more children.
  • The U.S. government encouraged the growth of families after the war.
  • The effects of the war and the Great Depression had started to subside such that people were more hopeful and optimistic of a better future for their families.
  • Popular culture, which was gaining significance after the war, glorified marriage, pregnancy, and parenthood.
  • The passing of the G.I. Bill of Rights by the U.S. Congress gave American veterans economic and educational opportunities, which supported them in pursuing higher education and homeownership at very low interest rates on loans.
  • Soon after the war, the increased safety with childbirths was also a credible cause, as the average marriage age of women decreased from 22 to 20.
  • The high urbanization rate and the low cost of living in the city and suburbs encouraged starting families after moving to these areas.
  • The availability of credit spurred borrowing and enabled support for large families.

Boomer Favorites

Clearly, Late Boomers are a complex species. I called another person with a December 31, 1964, birthday — Shannon Borg, a poet, author and wine writer living in the San Juan Islands, north of Seattle. “I grew up as the youngest boomer,” she writes, “in a house full of them.” (Being a writer, she prefers to answer via email.) According to Shannon, boomers “took much of the promise of post-WWII Earth and frittered it away around the world.” But she also credits them for making “a totally new paradigm for what it is to be an American.”

Baby boom — good or evil? Shannon won’t play that game; she resists my efforts to pin down her generational allegiances: “What polarizes us is the labeling and categorizing into increasingly small boxes. Us against them. Right versus left. This generation versus that. It makes good journalism, but bad politics.”

My next call was to a man in the Midwest, born at 11:29 p.m. on that December 31. I’ll call him Max. He didn’t want his name used, and can’t fathom why I’m doing a story on the Last Boomers. “I don’t think it has much meaning.” I press him. “People my age don’t think about it much.” Didn’t the baby boom have any impact? He allows that he remembers a little of the “feeling of the ’60s.” Which was? “Anything goes.” Max went into the military.

In the late 1960s, there was indeed a short period of anything goes. Then everything went. Now it’s the Republicans who remember Woodstock. And yet, the world is inarguably a very different place from what it was when the Greatest Generation ran it, and the Last Boomers are part of that transformation — even if they prefer not to admit it.

Finally, I reached out to a man who has a strong claim to being the very last Last Boomer. He was born minutes before midnight in America’s westernmost time zone. But all attempts to contact him — by phone, email and social media — were met with gnomic silence.

So I stalked him on Facebook. I’ll call him Ace, after Ace Frehley, ex-guitarist in Kiss. This Ace is a heavy metal drummer, and Kiss is his favorite band. I found an album recorded by our Ace’s band in the late 1990s. It was weightily heavy and metallically metal. But Ace’s Facebook presence is modest — tributes to other bands, snapshots from his relationship with an attractive woman, pictures of cats.

A lover of loud music leading a quiet and kitty-filled life, a performer in an exhibitionist genre who skips an opportunity to exhibit himself — perhaps Ace, whoever he is, embodies the contradictions of the Last Boomers. They’re like the quiet youngest child in a big family of loudmouth older siblings. They grew up in the baby boom universe and take it for granted. They may not know that there was ever another cosmos.

No Going Back

Now imagine dropping a Last Boomer into the Greatest Generation galaxy, the one those big siblings saw. Where it’s considered innately hilarious on TV to be black (The Amos ‘n Andy Show) or gay (Percy Dovetonsils on The Ernie Kovacs Show) or a woman who doesn’t want to stay home (I Love Lucy). Where Masters and Johnson just discovered sex, cigarettes are aerobic and spanking is sanctioned at home, school and — if patting secretary derrieres counts — office. It was a veritable hellscape of inappropriate behavior and wrongheaded social norms. And the older boomers destroyed it utterly.

Let’s look at one more Last Boomer. Barack Obama, born on August 4, 1961, is among the “first of the last.” He had fun, then got serious. He had ideals and — agree with the ideals or not — still has them. He works steadily and (for a politician) quietly to achieve his goals, unlike some older boomers (me) who preferred to just make idealistic noise. He’s got that boomer charisma, but he’s a little aloof. It’s very hard to imagine him at Woodstock. But I bet he at least knows what it was.

Resource:

https://www.seniorliving.org/life/baby-boomers/
https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/other/baby-boomers/
https://www.aarp.org/politics-society/history/info-2014/youngest-baby-boomers-turn-50.html

How to Continuously Learn About Yourself & the World

How to Continuously Learn About Yourself & the World

To thrive in this 21st-century era of change, it’s in our best interest to try to adopt a growth mindset: the belief that our intelligence is not innate, or fixed. It is something we have control over if we exert a bit of tenacity.

What are the first words that come to your mind when you see a small child at work or at play? Curious. Enthusiastic. Joyful. Exploring. Persistent. Confident. They don’t generally worry too much about failure or what others think.

They focus on trying to figure things out. They’re in a state of constant observation. When they get upset or hurt, it’s not forever. Sooner or later, they move on to the next thing. They may cry, but before long, they’re back at it.

They forget minor hurts and can’t be held back from learning and exploring again. When my four-year-old goes off to school in the mornings, we try to make sure she is clean, well-combed, and neatly dressed.

However, she rarely stays that way. Her hair gets messy; she gets paint on her clothes or dirt under her fingernails. She gets skinned knees more often than not. That doesn’t stop her.

People who have what we want – people we admire – almost always have an attitude of self-awareness, of wanting to improve and continually learn. They’re rarely perfect. Strive to let curiosity guide you in all situations.

When we feel anxious or afraid of new situations, our senses tend to go inward and close up. Instead, try to open up and take a minute to notice all the details around you. Be confident that your curiosity is helping you grow in ways you may not even see yet.

What Don’t You Like?

We often try – or pretend – to like things that we don’t actually enjoy in order to fit in with other people. By trying to bend yourself into a mold, you’re going to end up feeling unhappy and untrue to yourself, which is no fun at all!

Rather than forcing yourself into situations that you know you won’t enjoy, learn to speak up when you don’t like something. This is a big part of your personality, so there is no shame in saying no to certain events that you already know you won’t like.

Become comfortable and confident in what you enjoy as well as what you don’t enjoy, and accept that some things just aren’t for you. It doesn’t make you less likeable or less fun to be around just because you don’t enjoy everything!

Be rational and realize that everyone has something that they don’t like eating or doing or talking about. It’s perfectly natural to have dislikes, and learning what they are helps you shape your life around what you do like. By distinguishing between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ (for you, at least), you learn about yourself and how to truly nourish your mind, body, and spirit.

Have you thought about making a list of things you don’t like – this isn’t as negative as it sounds and can actually help reaffirm your own personality to yourself. Rather than trying to be someone you’re not, learn to be okay with who you are, dislikes and all.

What Matters To You?

We all have a set of beliefs and values that are instilled in us by our parents or carers, our schools, and our friends. As we grow up, it can be very easy to stick with these values by default and never really consider whether or not you still believe in them.

Getting to know yourself doesn’t necessarily mean accepting everything that you think you believe. Learn to challenge your own opinions, especially those that have passively entered your life through your upbringing.

Many of us have a set of values that have been heavily influenced by our childhood and which may no longer be relevant to us. Think about what actually matters to you and check that your perceived values are still relevant to how you live your life now, as an adult.

As a child, you may have thought you wanted to get married and have children, but that may now feel like a pressure looming over you as an adult. If that’s still what you want from life, go for it! If not, learn to reshape your values to fit around who you are now, not who you were then. You may want to focus on your career and not have children, so stop letting your teenage priorities hang over you.

Subconsciously, these past values that now clash with your current beliefs may be making you feel inadequate, so banish them from your mind. Find new values that fit in with your life now and work out what really matters to you.

Continue the Self-Education Loop

Once you’ve gone through the process of designing your sandbox, researching how to improve your skill, applying that knowledge to purposeful practice within your sandbox, and getting feedback on your work as you’re going, you simply repeat the process to continue developing your skill.

When you reach a learning goal, or feel like you’ve become comfortable with an aspect of the skill, you have to go back to the research phase to assess what else you need to learn, adjust your sandbox to allow you to learn that skill effectively, then purposefully practice it and solicit feedback to keep pushing yourself beyond your comfort zone.

This creates the self-education loop. A perpetual cycle of constant learning and improvement, where you never have to stop improving your abilities or stagnate at a learning plateau:

Source:

https://everydaypower.com/ways-learn-about-yourself/
https://www.aconsciousrethink.com/7419/get-to-know-yourself-better/
https://www.nateliason.com/blog/self-education